Goal This Week: Reached.


So I did it. 1,539 words reached this week.

I’m not doing too well, I got caught on a short flashback. Getting into the flashback was easy, I related the current situation to a very similar past situation, not hard. It’s getting back to the present from the flashback that I have troubles with.

Usually it’s something like: “And back to now where our hero is equally screwed, but more so since luck isn’t there this time like the time we just went through. Yay memories! But seriously, our hero is in deep.”

Of course that’s not exactly how it goes… I’m a little bit more eloquent about it and there are more details, but you get the gist.

Transitions have never been an issue for me before. All roads lead somewhere for me, they always have. I was the queen of transitions when it came to my essays.

I just can’t wait until I’m done this draft and can get to the editing. Yes, I know most authors dread the editing because it’s like tearing up your whole idea and piecing it back together, but I want to make this better!

I used to edit other people’s essays in school. I had three types: Structural Edit, Structural and Idea Edit, and finally Murder Edit. I would put so many red marks on that paper that it looked like it was the victim of a gruesome homicide.

I digress. I’m glad my novel is finally back on track. I’m approaching a section which I have written already, but I need to integrate it into the current version. I’m going to get a great big chunk of the draft done really quickly!

Look forward to elated posts in the near future my friends, I’ll have taken leaps in my draft!

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The End
Clues to Identifying Exposition Styles

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2 thoughts on “Goal This Week: Reached.

  1. “It’s getting back to the present from the flashback that I have troubles with.”

    I know what you mean. There are a lot of tricks to this, but the easiest method I find is to either have an external thing snap your MC back to the present (“…it was the grating sound of gears that pulled him back to focus…”) or, if what he/she is remembering in the flashback directly pertains to what is happening in the present you can always throw in a “…and here he is again, faced with the same dilemma (but with cooler phrasing that fits the character’s voice).”

    There are a lot of ways to do this, really, but it does take some finesse. The best thing to do is read established writers (the “greats,” I call them) and try to maintain a radar for when these kinds of happenings occur in their writings.

    Best of luck!

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