A Court of Mist and Fury: Wow.


Moments ago I finished reading A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas. Wow, does not cover it. There are too many words that I want to use and non of them can encompass the amazing novel I just spent my entire day reading because I couldn’t put it down.

I did pause for food and water, I’m not that self destructive, but I had only read about a quarter of the way through this 624 page book before I sat down and devoured it today. Just shows how much I can read on a day that I don’t have to deal with adulthood.

Maas has outdone herself. The way she managed to manipulate my emotions and my sensations was remarkable. I lived and breathed with Feyre, the main character, through the whole novel. I don’t understand the power that Maas wields over me with there words, but I love it.

The novel starts slow and that’s likely why it took me some time to actually sit and read through, but it has to. Once you get midway through you realize that Feyre needs that time to adjust and deal with her PTSD. You go through it with her and you’re on her side, willing that fire in her to ignite, for her to become that strength you know she is.

Normally, I would find flaws in even my favourite novels, but apart from a few editing errors where clearly spellcheck added the wrong word, I found no flaws in her plot, no re-story telling of that same story so over used.

There’s not much more I can say other than read it. READ IT. Maas is the top of my list for authors, without a doubt. You don’t read her work, you live it.

Similar Posts:
The Book That Blew Me Way: A Court of Mist and Fury
#FridayBookShare A Court of Mist and Fury by @SJMaas
A Court of Mist and Fury: 10 Out of 5 Stars

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Don’t Ever Stop – The Wise Man’s Fear


Dear Readers,

I apologize for the delay in reviews, but I’ve been indulging in The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss for months. Yes, months. I’m a slow reader by nature, but I’ve been savouring this novel because, simply put, it is amazingly written.

Rothfuss likes to take his sweet time writing a novel, so I thought I’d do the same when enjoying it. If I ever become half as good a writer as Rothfuss I can die knowing that I’ve accomplished something incredible.

The subtle way in which Rothfuss uses language to convey a sensation or feeling is masterful. His words, while sometimes seemingly simple are clearly deliberate. There was not one word in The Wise Man’s Fear that I could have done without.

The story flows in such a way that you feel as if you’re traveling down a river in a canoe without a paddle, but the river’s direction is deliberate. No matter how fast or slow you float, you feel the determination behind what is happening to you. There is reason behind ever dip, turn, rapid, and shallow. I was never bored. My mind never traveled away from the page, as it has during countless other novels. Rothfuss is a masterful story teller.

I love this novel and its predecessor The Name of the Wind was just as intoxicating. I found no flaw in either novel, and you folks know how much I enjoy finding flaws. Rothfuss is officially the top of my favourites list. (A certain friend’s husband will likely be throwing an “I told you so” or two my way for this).

If you haven’t already, pick up a Rothfuss and dive into Kvothe’s world, you won’t regret it.