Don’t Ever Stop – The Wise Man’s Fear


Dear Readers,

I apologize for the delay in reviews, but I’ve been indulging in The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss for months. Yes, months. I’m a slow reader by nature, but I’ve been savouring this novel because, simply put, it is amazingly written.

Rothfuss likes to take his sweet time writing a novel, so I thought I’d do the same when enjoying it. If I ever become half as good a writer as Rothfuss I can die knowing that I’ve accomplished something incredible.

The subtle way in which Rothfuss uses language to convey a sensation or feeling is masterful. His words, while sometimes seemingly simple are clearly deliberate. There was not one word in The Wise Man’s Fear that I could have done without.

The story flows in such a way that you feel as if you’re traveling down a river in a canoe without a paddle, but the river’s direction is deliberate. No matter how fast or slow you float, you feel the determination behind what is happening to you. There is reason behind ever dip, turn, rapid, and shallow. I was never bored. My mind never traveled away from the page, as it has during countless other novels. Rothfuss is a masterful story teller.

I love this novel and its predecessor The Name of the Wind was just as intoxicating. I found no flaw in either novel, and you folks know how much I enjoy finding flaws. Rothfuss is officially the top of my favourites list. (A certain friend’s husband will likely be throwing an “I told you so” or two my way for this).

If you haven’t already, pick up a Rothfuss and dive into Kvothe’s world, you won’t regret it.

The Angel’s Game – Just, Wow.


This morning, as I sipped my tea and curled up under a soft blanket on what has to be one of the comfiest couches known to man, I finished another masterpiece by Carlos Ruiz Zafon.

The first book that I’d ever read of his was The Shadow of the Wind. I fell madly in love with Zafon’s prose even as a teenager and I urged  anyone who would listen to read it. Zafon has such a poetic way with language that I can only dream about possessing.

This time, I read The Shadow of the Wind‘s predecessor, The Angel’s Game. Another book about an author writing a book, gee I wonder why I relate so much…

Anyways, The Angel’s Game took so many twists and turns that I honestly had no idea where I was headed, which in my opinion is the best kind of writing because it mimics how life unfolds.

This novel is dark, unfathomably dark both in visualization and emotion. Zafon tears at your heart strings while strumming a low frightful tune on them simultaneously. The characters whom my heart went out to were destroyed, those I disdained blackened me, those that I was unclear on never stopped surprising me… I had trouble putting it down.

There was a moment where I was ready to slap Zafon, however. It appeared that he was going to go with the “it’s all in your own head/schizophrenic” route and I was ready to scream… such an amazing novel, so beautifully articulated and put together and he was going to pull a Chuck Palahniuk?! But, then Zafon came through and made it all this own and I sighed one of the biggest sighs of relief. 

This novel is amazing, as is all the work I’ve read by Zafon. If you haven’t already picked his work up, do it.

There was one quote that literally brought me to tears. The main character, David is describing books to his assistant, Isabella as a farewell.

Every book has a soul, the soul of the person who wrote it and the soul of those who read it and dream about it.”

That hit home for me, because it’s something that I’ve always believed but never been able to articulate. I suppose I am just like Senor Sempere in the novel, I live for the souls of books.

Do read Carlos Ruiz Zafon. There will be no regrets. So, keep reading dearest reader.

I Didn’t Get the Blues


I finally finished reading a book! Also, I finally finished my semester!

It’s been a bumpy road this semester, but I handed in my last paper so what did I do with my free time? I finished reading Even Cowgirls Get the Blues. 

My first thought: Tom Robbins I absolutely love you. His quirky, witty, clever, insightful, fun, and enigmatic.

Even Cowgirls Get the Blues  was a great read. I suggest everyone read it. It’s in an interesting style and has the ability to warm your heart, and yet shock and appal you. It’s fantastic.

I’m running on a couple hours of sleep so I’m making this a short review today. I think I’ll be delving into The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy next.

Happy reading everyone, and enjoy your festivities whatever they may be.