A Court of Mist and Fury: Wow.


Moments ago I finished reading A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas. Wow, does not cover it. There are too many words that I want to use and non of them can encompass the amazing novel I just spent my entire day reading because I couldn’t put it down.

I did pause for food and water, I’m not that self destructive, but I had only read about a quarter of the way through this 624 page book before I sat down and devoured it today. Just shows how much I can read on a day that I don’t have to deal with adulthood.

Maas has outdone herself. The way she managed to manipulate my emotions and my sensations was remarkable. I lived and breathed with Feyre, the main character, through the whole novel. I don’t understand the power that Maas wields over me with there words, but I love it.

The novel starts slow and that’s likely why it took me some time to actually sit and read through, but it has to. Once you get midway through you realize that Feyre needs that time to adjust and deal with her PTSD. You go through it with her and you’re on her side, willing that fire in her to ignite, for her to become that strength you know she is.

Normally, I would find flaws in even my favourite novels, but apart from a few editing errors where clearly spellcheck added the wrong word, I found no flaws in her plot, no re-story telling of that same story so over used.

There’s not much more I can say other than read it. READ IT. Maas is the top of my list for authors, without a doubt. You don’t read her work, you live it.

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Queen of Shadows – Yes! Yes! Yes!


Last night I finished Queen of Shadows by Sarah J Maas, well more like this morning at 2am. I have to say, this is the best one yet of the Throne of Glass Series. Maas has outdone herself both linguistically and through her plot. There was not one moment in the novel that I predicted, not one pause for me to catch my breath between incidences. I wish I had even half of Maas’ talent. 

I remember my review on her first novel, Throne of Glass was definitely harsh and cynical, but Maas has bloomed into an amazing author. The way she crafts a fight scene is unbelievable. I struggle with fight scenes myself, because how do you fit a flurry of movement that in reality would take 2 seconds into a description that will likely take the reader a minute to read without losing authenticity and the feeling of speed and chaos?

Usually when I read novels like this, I’m not really a fan of jumping between character perspectives. It tends to feel like a “too many cooks in the kitchen” scenario. But, Maas does this remarkably well. She utilizes this technique in order to enrich a scene, to show it from all angles and all eyes. She does this most effectively at the end of the novel where she has short snippets of the same scene viewed from multiple characters to show the chaos of the moment.

I can’t praise Maas enough. I dragged out the reading of Queen of Shadows because I honestly did not want it to end, then I finished the last 250 pages in one sitting last night. Maas’ next novel in the series, Empire of Storms is already out in hard cover, but being my OCD self I need to wait for the North American paperback version to buy it. I also don’t like not reading the copies of my own novels so I will be waiting until then to read Empire of Storms, so no spoilers!

I highly recommend to anyone, if you haven’t already started the Throne of Glass series, DO IT!

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Top of the Charts: A Review of A Court of Thorns and Roses


Literally, moments ago I read the last few pages of A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas and I’ve got to say, Maas has done it again. I’ve loved every single one of her Throne of Glass novels and now she’s got a new series I’m so excited about I pre-ordered the second book, A Court of Mist and Fury before I even finished reading the first book.

I’m sorry Snyder, just Maas has just beat you to the top of my favourites list.

A Court of Thorns and Roses seems to start off slow, building your understanding of the main character, Feyre. Also, I have to appreciate that within the first ten pages, Maas actually explains the pronunciation of Feyre so that I stupidly wasn’t reading it wrong through the whole book. It was very subtle and perfectly placed.

Some of the later plot points are kind of obvious and you can tell from which stories Maas has used these incidences, but we’re all guilty of that. I believe someone said there are only a finite amount of stories in the world and they’re all re-told in different ways.

Maas’ prose keep you captivated throughout the novel and her descriptive talents are intimidating to say the least. Rarely was I reading, but rather watching the story unfold in my mind’s eye.

The story flows very well, and while I sometimes struggled with the rather “quaint” intelligence of Feyre I really loved the novel. To be fair, her character is a minimally educated, young and impoverished girl so I can’t really blame her lack of knowledge on anything but her situation.

I highly recommend this to those looking for a great fantasy read. Especially if you’re into faerie lore. I absolutely devoured this book.

I don’t really recommended it to the guys though, despite some really great “steamy” scenes, this novel is really geared towards a female reader.

The Assassin’s Blade


Just before my own journeys begin, I’ve finished The Assassin’s Blade by Sarah J. Maas. This collection of novellas is a prequel to Maas’ debut novel Throne of Glass, which I reviewed not too long ago.

I really enjoyed learning the origins of Celaena Sardothien, Maas’ main character. While a lot of her first novel’s plot seemed almost borrowed from many other stories these novellas felt far more original. I feel as if these novellas were written after the original manuscript.

It was a quick and relatively lax read. I did like it though, despite my minimal judgements.

One thing about Celaena that bothers me is her inability to accept the obvious truths in front of her. Now, normally that would be an acceptable character flaw for most, but considering her past it doesn’t work for this character… the one who betrays her in the end was so obvious from the get go, through EVERYTHING and yet this world-remound assassin can’t see it? Denial can only blind any person so much. That’s one thing in Maas’ character logic that just doesn’t make sense to me.

I do recommend reading The Assassin’s Blade before Throne of Glass if only to give yourself some background on Celaena. I do have a different outlook on the character than I did when I first read Throne of Glass.

My first travel post will be coming in a matter of days, however it will be relatively mundane as it will mostly be me trying to figure out what the heck I’m getting myself into by traveling to distant countries with little to no planning. It’ll be interesting to see how I hold up alone, far away, with my only wits and sense to depend on. If anything, it should produce an interesting narrative.

Cheers and keep reading.

Throne of Glass, More Epic Than It Sounds


I’d like to preface this review by saying I devoured this 406 page novel in 48 hours, less if you don’t count the hours I spent sleeping.

Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas was definitely a whirl wind of excitement, intrigue, turmoil, lust, emotions, and just old fashioned will power. It was definitely a fun and good read. Maas has a way with balancing description, action, and dialogue that I strive for in my own work. Her novel reminded me of Maria V. Snyder’s style, yet with a touch more brutality, I loved it.

That all being said, the praise being dolled out in spades, I’ve got to put in my two or five or ten cents regarding criticism. Now, I realize that coming up with an original plot is difficult, and while Maas’s plot was in fact relatively original I found many concepts or scenes were, let’s call it “borrowed.” I found that Throne of Glass, if completely broken down was an amalgamation of The Hunger Games (twenty-four “champions” fighting for their right to survive), Poison Study (a young girl trapped between death and working for a king she loathes, as well as a world overtaken by a ruler who has banned and destroyed magic), The Chamber of Secrets (fighting a giant scary monster in a secret room under a castle summoned by a dark magic wielder), Cinderella (a girl forbidden to attend a ball does so and dances the night away with a Prince), Game of Thrones (every person in any political standing is out to destroy anyone for power, including the king), True Blood (the whole Fae/Faerie ancient magic deal), and Daughter of Smoke and Bone (the power to jump through to other worlds with deadly monsters and creatures of light).

I love all these books/movies/shows, so I’m not saying it’s a bad thing. I know it can be hard to reduce the influence reading can have on your work. I know my own work can be compared to many other works and have many similarities.

Bottom line, it’s a great book. Of course, it was recommended, and by “recommended” I mean she gave it to me as a Christmas present and said I must read it, by my very best gal, writer of Lea At Sea. She always gives me the best recommendations and I then pass on these glowing reviews to you.

Read Throne of Glassit’s a good read and the first fantasy I’ve read in a while that’s actually written well! Maas knows her prose and the english language. She’s a good writer, I’m excited to read more of her work.